The Hammer in Action

Be sure to check out Dave’s take on some of these matches in part one of his interview with Greg Wyshynski at Yahoo’s NHL blog, Puck Daddy.

 

Schultz (#8 Flyers) vs. Dale Rolfe (#5 NY Rangers) - 1974 Playoffs

 

Check out the fight that hockeyadventure.com calls “one of the most notoriously brutal” fights in NHL history. The aftermath of this fight led to the Flyers winning the series against the Rangers and going on to become Stanley Cup champions.



Schultz (#8 Flyers) vs. Dave Williams (#22 Toronto Maple Leafs) - April 22, 1976

This lengthy and spirited double-header occurs when Schultz and fellow Flyer Bobby Kelly (#9) make their displeasure known after Bobby Clarke receives a dangerous slash from Williams. All this occurs during the game in which Schultz set the record for most penalty minutes in one playoff game, with a grand total of 42.

Schultz (#8 Flyers) vs. Clark Gillies (#9 NY Islanders) - 1975

There are only 22 seconds left in Game 5 of the semifinals’ series against the Islanders when Schultz drops the gloves with Gillies, then in his rookie season.

Schultz (#8 Flyers) vs. Terry O’Reilly (#24 Boston Bruins)

Bruins vs. Bullies. What more needs to be said about this classic brawl?

Schultz (#14 Kings) vs. Stan Jonathan (#14 Boston Bruins) - 1976-78

Schultz takes on the Bruin’s tough right-winger Jonathan, who was always willing to drop the gloves. Watch for the onslaught of Schultz’ fast and furious hits, which lasts until the refs come in to separate the combatants.

Schultz (#8 Flyers) vs Larry Robinson (#19 Montreal Canadiens)

This clip starts with the aftermath of a powerful hit from Schultz on Canadiens player John Van Boxmeer, but the action really gets going at the 1:00 mark when Pierre Bouchard high sticks Bobby Clarke after the buzzer and both teams’ benches are emptied as the frustrated players take to the ice. During the ensuing melee, Schultz and Robinson pair off and give the crowd quite a show.

Schultz (#8 Penguins) vs. Behn Wilson (#9 Flyers)

After being traded to the Pens from the Kings, Schultz continued to be a hard-hitting and intense player, as this clip of him taking on Wilson shows. Both opponents let fly with some fast punches before the refs decide it’s time to settle things down.

Schultz (#8 Flyers) vs Ted Irvine (#27 NY Rangers) - 1975

Tempers flare in this game between division rivals, Flyers and Rangers. And at no point in the game was this rivalry more evident than in this match-up between Schultz and Irvine, which had to be broken up by two referees while Schultz threw punches over their heads.

Schultz wears number 8 for the Philadelphia Flyers, while Irvine wears number 27 for the New York Rangers:



Schultz (#8 Flyers) vs. Garry Howatt (#8 NY Islanders) - 1975

This infamous fight involves not only Schultz and Howatt, but also a few refs, a hatless security guard (plus six or seven more to control the unruly NY crowd), an unlucky glove, and one determined fan who reaches over the glass to grab The Hammer’s jersey not once, but twice. If you want to see an entertaining Bullies-era fight, this is the video you’re looking for.

Dave Schultz (#8 Flyers) vs. Keith Magnuson (#3 Chicago Blackhawks) - 1975

For a summary of this fight you can do no better than how the commentator calls the shots. Magnuson gets the first hit in, but after that the fight is all Schultz, throwing a “tremendous right” with his “tremendous booming right hand.” Watch as Magnuson “gets pummeled” and “beaten to a pulp” while The Hammer “takes [him] apart.”

Schultz (#8 Flyers) vs. Bryan Hextall (#20 Atlanta Flames) - 1974

Having a well-known hockey name doesn’t protect you from violence on the ice, as Bryan Hextall discovered during this brutally one-sided bout. Schultz lets the punches fly fast and furious, pounding Hextall until he turns to a lineman and asks for assistance in breaking up the fight.

Interview with Dave Schultz (1970s)

In this brief interview with The Hammer, hear about how fan reaction and protecting his teammates are integral reasons for his decidedly feisty style of play.